Ariel is such a ponce.

I’m reading Shakespeare’s The Tempest at the moment. Just a bit of light reading.

Anyway. The airy-fairy-spritey-nymph known as Ariel is a bit of a ponce.

“All hail, great master! grave sir, hail! I come
To answer thy best pleasure; be’t to fly,
To swim, to dive into the fire, to ride
On the curl’d clouds. To thy strong bidding task
Ariel, and all his quality.”

“Where the bee sucks, there lurk I;
In a cowslip’s bell I lie;
There I couch when owls do cry.
On the bat’s back I do fly
After summer merrily.
Merrily, merrily, shall I live now,
Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.”

As if bigging himself up in the third person wasn’t enough, he even ‘does his sprinting gently’. I mean come on matey. Man up just a tiny bit. I realise you’re a fairy, but anyone who creates a verb out of ‘sprite’, and attaches a level of severity to it, needs to stop.

I jest of course. Really. I am a big fan of good old Shakespeare, and I liest not. (Thou list!) And Ariel’s okay really. Even if he does have the same name as the little mermaid and has wings and flounces about with cowslip bells and sucking bees.

Just thought I’d share that.

In other news; a photo of a rather patriotic taxi. Saw it recently, snapped a shot, and here it is.

Enjoy! :)

20120131-225244.jpg

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. John S
    Feb 01, 2012 @ 01:06:57

    Saw a fantastic version of The Tempest a year or two ago at the Richmond Theatre. A joint production between the RSC and a South African company, the Baxter Theatre. The mystical elements of the play – of which there are many – had a real African flavour. The music was intoxicating. Anthony Sher was the main man, Prospero – a real master class in acting. Shakespeare lives!

    Reply

    • TLS
      Feb 01, 2012 @ 13:35:58

      John, you’ll never believe it but I went to see that exact same production in 2009! It as amazing, we all loved it. The bright colours and African drums put such a different spin on the play. I had completely forgotten about it, thanks for reminding me!

      Reply

  2. rogerdengle
    Feb 01, 2012 @ 06:49:11

    TBH Ariel bugs the heck out of me. He gives in way to easily to Prospero’s refusal to set him free immediately. I think my favorite character in the play is Caliban. That guy knows how to cuss someone out. He reminds me of an old neighbor I used to have. I also feel sorry for him. Prospero abuses him terribly and he knows there’s not a thing he can do about it. I want to see him catch Prospero off guard.

    Reply

    • TLS
      Feb 01, 2012 @ 13:39:31

      Oh, I completely agree with you. Caliban is certainly a bit of a fool, but you have to remember that he speaks the way he does because he does not share our language. You do have to have some sympathy for him – he has no family, and his dead mother, Sycorax, was not a nice lady. I don’t really blame him for his actions either – as you said he has been so ill-treated by Prospero.

      Reply

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